Re: Pliny's "Guthalus- "Richard Wordingham"

From: tgpedersen
Message: 16104
Date: 2002-10-09

--- In cybalist@..., "Richard Wordingham" <richard.wordingham@...>
wrote:
> --- In cybalist@..., "tgpedersen" <tgpedersen@...> wrote:
> > --- In cybalist@..., "Richard Wordingham"
> <richard.wordingham@...>
> > wrote:
> > > >
> > > > Try the really big bodies of water. How were the Atlantic,
> > > Pacific, Indian,
> > > > Artic Oceans named? More importantly, how were those names
> > spread
> > > and
> > > > preserved? Historical naming suggests a very difference
> scenario
> > > then the
> > > > "true native name" idea assumed for preliterate European
rivers
> > >
> > > There was only one 'Ocean' before literacy. It didn't need a
> name.
> > >
> > > Richard.
> >
> > An example. 'Vesterhavet' in Danish is the North
Sea. 'Vesterhavet'
> > in Swedish is Kattegat. But in my lifetime this designation has
> been
> > almost replaced by 'Nords√łen', ultimately from Dutch maritime
maps,
> > probably to reduce this confusion. Even the English seem to
accept
> > this term which only makes sense from a Dutch perspective (as
> opposed
> > to the Zuiderzee).
>
> I suspect we couldn't see the ocean for the seas!
>
> My father told me that the North Sea used to be known as the German
> Sea, but that that name became unacceptable when Britain and
Germany
> were at war with one another.
>
> Richard.

Did he also tell you why you decided to adopt the Dutch term? ;-) My
guess is it has to do with finding a common terminology for areas in
meteorology, as that science(?) grew international after the last war.

Torsten